thesis writing book

thesis writing book

Thesis writing is an essential skill that medical and other postgraduates are expected to learn during their academic career as a mandatory partial requirement in order to receive the Master’s degree. However, at the majority of medical schools, writing a thesis is largely based on self-learning, which adds to the burden on students due to the tremendous amount of time spent learning the writing skills in addition to their exhausting clinical and academic work. Due to the difficulties faced during the early grooming years and lack of adequate guidance, acquiring writing skills continues to be a daunting task for most students.
Prof. Parija has been honored with more than 25 awards including the Medical Council of India’s Dr. BC Roy National Award and the National Academy of Medical Sciences’ Dr. PN Chuttani Oration Award. Prof. Parija founded the Indian Academy of Tropical Parasitology (IATP), the only professional organization of Medical Parasitologists in India, and initiated the journal Tropical Parasitology. Professor Parija in collaboration with Prof. Vikram Kate edited a book on Writing and Publishing a Scientific Paper, which was published by Springer Nature in 2017.

Lecturers, request your electronic inspection copy here
‘Written in an authoritative and accessible style, this is a must-read for anyone planning, researching and writing a doctoral thesis or dissertation. I will certainly be recommending this book to my research students.’
– Professor Goeffrey Elliott, University of Worcester


1- The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing) 4th Edition, by Wayne C. Booth (Author), Gregory G. Colomb (Author), Joseph M. Williams (Author), Joseph Bizup (Author), William T. FitzGerald (Author)
‘Conceived by seasoned researchers and educators Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, this fundamental work explains how to find and evaluate sources, anticipate and respond to reader reservations, and integrate these pieces into an argument that stands up to reader critique.’
6- The Dissertation Journey: A Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Planning, Writing, and Defending Your Dissertation 2nd Edition by Carol M. Roberts (Author)
‘A dissertation can be challenging, but this informative book helps you overcome the obstacles along the way. Using graphics, checklists, and sample forms, this guide readies you for each step of the process, including selecting the committee, getting acclimated to academic writing, preparing for your oral defense, and publishing your research. ’

Thesis writing book
Have you read these books? Or any others that you think have significantly helped you on your PhD journey? Love to hear about them in the comments.
Although “Helping doctoral students write” has more of a humanities bent than ‘how to write a thesis’, it steps through a broad range of thesis writing issues with a light touch that never makes you feel bored or frustrated. It argues that the thesis is a genre proposition – an amazingly powerful insight – and the chapter on grammar is simply a work of brilliance.

Thesis writing book
But the most alluring aspect of Eco’s book is the way he imagines the community that results from any honest intellectual endeavor—the conversations you enter into across time and space, across age or hierarchy, in the spirit of free-flowing, democratic conversation. He cautions students against losing themselves down a narcissistic rabbit hole: you are not a “defrauded genius” simply because someone else has happened upon the same set of research questions. “You must overcome any shyness and have a conversation with the librarian,” he writes, “because he can offer you reliable advice that will save you much time. You must consider that the librarian (if not overworked or neurotic) is happy when he can demonstrate two things: the quality of his memory and erudition and the richness of his library, especially if it is small. The more isolated and disregarded the library, the more the librarian is consumed with sorrow for its underestimation.”
Eco’s career has been defined by a desire to share the rarefied concerns of academia with a broader reading public. He wrote a novel that enacted literary theory (“The Name of the Rose”) and a children’s book about atoms conscientiously objecting to their fate as war machines (“The Bomb and the General”). “How to Write a Thesis” is sparked by the wish to give any student with the desire and a respect for the process the tools for producing a rigorous and meaningful piece of writing. “A more just society,” Eco writes at the book’s outset, would be one where anyone with “true aspirations” would be supported by the state, regardless of their background or resources. Our society does not quite work that way. It is the students of privilege, the beneficiaries of the best training available, who tend to initiate and then breeze through the thesis process.

References:

http://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/writing-your-thesis/book240394
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2017/09/9-great-books-to-help-you-with-writing.html?m=1
http://thesiswhisperer.com/2014/11/26/the-best-two-books-on-doing-a-thesis/
http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/a-guide-to-thesis-writing-that-is-a-guide-to-life
http://interactivemedia.bradley.edu/ell/nmt/your_thesis_n_claims.html

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