thesis claim

thesis claim

A thesis statement is one sentence that expresses the main idea of a research paper or essay, such as an expository essay or argumentative essay. It makes a claim, directly answering a question.
Think of it as a loving mother steering her children away from danger. Essay writers run the risk of getting off track and wandering into thickly wooded forests of needless tangents. (This is also why a well-planned outline is essential.) However, a solid thesis statement will help keep you in check. Refer back to it and ask have you wandered off topic?
Always Be Specific

There are sometimes implied claims of fact and value lurking inside claims of policy. For example:
“Since smoking is bad for the health of the smoker and imposes 2nd hand smoke risks to others, smoking on campus should be banned.” Nevertheless, the argument will turn/hinge on the policy claim.
These are NOT THE CLAIMS THE AUTHOR MAKES. These are claims you make about the reading after reading it:

  • How does science fiction literature affect our understanding of other cultures?

Example of a weak research question:

Thesis claim
If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you’re on the right track. It’s always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.
A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.

Thesis claim

Can a thesis statement be more than one sentence long??

First, you need to decide what sort of claim you want to make about the subject: FACT, VALUE OR POLICY. Review the reading, your notes, and discuss your ideas in class or with a friend.

References:

http://interactivemedia.bradley.edu/ell/nmt/your_thesis_n_claims.html
http://apus.libanswers.com/writing/faq/102559
http://www.servicescape.com/blog/25-thesis-statement-examples-that-will-make-writing-a-breeze
http://people.highline.edu/sowings/Engl101/WriSkill/MakingAClaim.htm
http://app.shoreline.edu/doldham/102/HTML/Identifying%20a%20Thesis.html

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