supporting thesis

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supporting thesis

Supporting thesis
Supporting your thesis is the overall goal of your whole paper. It means presenting information that will convince your readers that your thesis makes sense. You need to take care to choose the best supporting details for your thesis.
You are likely to find or think of details that relate to your topic and are interesting, but that do not support your thesis. Including such details in your paper is unwise because they are distracting and irrelevant.

Here, the writer has chosen four ideas that can be developed into paragraphs supporting her thesis. She can also use this as part of an outline A preliminary plan for a piece of a writing, often in the form of a list. It should include a topic, audience, purpose, thesis statement, and main and supporting points. for the essay.
Thesis statements bring unity to a piece of writing, giving it a focus and a purpose, and the supporting ideas supply the content that develops the thesis. When writing a business proposal, you will need to clarify what you are proposing and why (thesis statement) and then outline reasons why the audience should support this (supporting ideas). The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers billions of dollars in loans to new businesses every year. A person who writes a proposal using a clear thesis with strong supporting ideas has a good chance of having the proposal accepted and getting the money needed to start a new business.

  • To teach you to state your case and prove it in a clear, appropriate, and lively manner
  • To teach you to structure your thinking.

Consequently, all expository writing, in which you formulate a thesis and attempt to prove it, is an opportunity to practice rigorous, focused thinking habits that can result not only in better papers, but in sharper analytical skills across the board.

The thesis statement is the sentence that states the main idea of a writing assignment and helps control the ideas within the paper. It is not merely a topic. It often reflects an opinion or judgment that a writer has made about a reading or personal experience. For instance: Tocqueville believed that the domestic role most women held in America was the role that gave them the most power, an idea that many would hotly dispute today.
A good practice is to put the thesis statement at the end of your introduction so you can use it to lead into the body of your paper. This allows you, as the writer, to lead up to the thesis statement instead of diving directly into the topic. If you place the thesis statement at the beginning, your reader may forget or be confused about the main idea by the time he/she reaches the end of the introduction. Remember, a good introduction conceptualizes and anticipates the thesis statement.

An effective thesis has a definable, arguable claim. “While cultural forces contributed to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe, the disintegration of economies played the key role in driving its decline” is an effective thesis sentence that “telegraphs,” so that the reader expects the essay to have a section about cultural forces and another about the disintegration of economies. This thesis makes a definite, arguable claim: that the disintegration of economies played a more important role than cultural forces in defeating communism in Eastern Europe. The reader would react to this statement by thinking, “Perhaps what the author says is true, but I am not convinced. I want to read further to see how the author argues this claim.”
Think of yourself as a member of a jury, listening to a lawyer who is presenting an opening argument. You’ll want to know very soon whether the lawyer believes the accused to be guilty or not guilty, and how the lawyer plans to convince you. Readers of academic essays are like jury members: before they have read too far, they want to know what the essay argues as well as how the writer plans to make the argument. After reading your thesis statement, the reader should think, “This essay is going to try to convince me of something. I’m not convinced yet, but I’m interested to see how I might be.”

References:

http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit02/Foundations/developing-a-thesis-statement-and-supporting-ideas.html
http://www.butte.edu/departments/cas/tipsheets/style_purpose_strategy/thesis.html
http://gustavus.edu/writingcenter/handoutdocs/thesis_statements.php
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit02/Foundations/developing-a-thesis-statement-and-supporting-ideas.html

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