support thesis

support thesis

Support thesis
Supporting your thesis is the overall goal of your whole paper. It means presenting information that will convince your readers that your thesis makes sense. You need to take care to choose the best supporting details for your thesis.
Take great care to organize your supporting details so that they can best support your thesis. One strategy is to list the most powerful information first. Another is to present information in a natural sequence, such as chronological A method of narrative arrangement that places events in their order of occurrence. order. A third option is to use a compare/contrast A writing pattern used to explain how two (or more) things are alike and different. format. Choose whatever method you think will most clearly support your thesis.

4. Identifying supporting arguments
Now you must gather material, or find arguments to support your thesis statement. Aristotle taught his students to examine any claim by “discovering arguments.” You will use some of his techniques to formulate support for your claim. Brainstorm, adapting the questions below as a guide, and writing down even the ideas that don’t appear to you very promising–you can sort through them later.

  • Definition: What is good behavior? What is bad behavior? What is appropriate behavior on St. Patrick’s Day? What is appropriate behavior in other settings?
  • Comparison/Similarity: How was behavior last St. Patrick’s Day similar to behavior in years past? How was behavior in front of La Salle’s similar to behavior in other parts of downtown that day? How was this behavior similar to behavior in other college towns on that day?
  • Comparison/Dissimilarity: How did behavior last St. Patrick’s Day differ from behavior in years past? How did behavior in front of La Salle’s differ from behavior in other parts of downtown that day? How did this behavior differ from student behavior in other college towns on that day?
  • Comparison/Degree: To what degree was student behavior worse than in years past? To what degree was this behavior worse than in other parts of downtown? To what degree was this behavior worse than student behavior in other college towns?
  • Relationship (cause and effect): What causes good behavior? What are the results of good behavior? What causes bad behavior? What are the results of bad behavior? What were the specific results of the behavior on St. Patrick’s Day? What were the specific causes of the behavior on St. Patrick’s Day?
  • Circumstance: Has this kind of behavior occurred in the past? Should this behavior be permitted in the future? What is possible–that is, in this case, is it possible for students to behave appropriately even if bored, drunk, or provoked? Is it possible for downtown merchants and bystanders to absorb the costs of property damage?
  • Testimony: What are the opinions of others about student behavior in front of La Salle’s on St. Patrick’s Day (for example, students who participated, students who observed, students who were injured, students who avoided downtown Chico altogether on St. Patrick’s Day, city council members, the police chief, the proprietor of La Salle’s, the owner of the damaged car, nearby business owners)?
  • The Good: Would the results of enforced good conduct be “good”? Would the results of enforced good conduct cause unintended or unforeseen problems? What is fair to whom?
  • The Expedient: Is it desirable to require better conduct next St. Patrick’s Day? Should authorities force better conduct next year? Should St. Patrick’s Day celebrations be cancelled? Should everyone just relax about this incident and let students celebrate? Should students be asked to improve their conduct voluntarily next year? Should Associated Students provide an education campaign about respect for others, provide alternative activities, or additional patrols?

A good thesis has two parts. It should tell what you plan to argue, and it should “telegraph” how you plan to argue—that is, what particular support for your claim is going where in your essay.
Keep your thesis prominent in your introduction. A good, standard place for your thesis statement is at the end of an introductory paragraph, especially in shorter (5-15 page) essays. Readers are used to finding theses there, so they automatically pay more attention when they read the last sentence of your introduction. Although this is not required in all academic essays, it is a good rule of thumb.

The thesis statement is the sentence that states the main idea of a writing assignment and helps control the ideas within the paper. It is not merely a topic. It often reflects an opinion or judgment that a writer has made about a reading or personal experience. For instance: Tocqueville believed that the domestic role most women held in America was the role that gave them the most power, an idea that many would hotly dispute today.
A good practice is to put the thesis statement at the end of your introduction so you can use it to lead into the body of your paper. This allows you, as the writer, to lead up to the thesis statement instead of diving directly into the topic. If you place the thesis statement at the beginning, your reader may forget or be confused about the main idea by the time he/she reaches the end of the introduction. Remember, a good introduction conceptualizes and anticipates the thesis statement.

References:

http://www.butte.edu/departments/cas/tipsheets/style_purpose_strategy/thesis.html
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://gustavus.edu/writingcenter/handoutdocs/thesis_statements.php
http://saylordotorg.github.io/text_handbook-for-writers/s10-03-supporting-a-thesis.html

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