support thesis statement

support thesis statement

As you can see, the writer began by answering a very general question, but as she continued, she was able to narrow her topic and arrive at a clear purpose for writing. As a result of answering these questions, the writer has a tentative thesis statement An early form of a thesis statement that can be developed into a more formal thesis statement by creating supporting details. , which can be developed into a more formal thesis statement with supporting details.
Developing a Thesis Statement and Supporting Ideas

Support thesis statement
Supporting your thesis is the overall goal of your whole paper. It means presenting information that will convince your readers that your thesis makes sense. You need to take care to choose the best supporting details for your thesis.
Take great care to organize your supporting details so that they can best support your thesis. One strategy is to list the most powerful information first. Another is to present information in a natural sequence, such as chronological A method of narrative arrangement that places events in their order of occurrence. order. A third option is to use a compare/contrast A writing pattern used to explain how two (or more) things are alike and different. format. Choose whatever method you think will most clearly support your thesis.

5. Revising your thesis
Notice that in the sentence above we used the phrase “a thesis statement” rather than “your thesis statement.” This is because, as you examine your thesis statement through the Aristotelian method, you may discover that you were wrong. At this point, you should either revise your thesis or choose another subject and begin again. Revising your opinion in light of convincing evidence is the beginning of wisdom. Besides, even if it is possible to proceed with the essay as you first envisioned it, you will find it more difficult to defend a thesis you have previously discredited in your notes.
Consequently, all expository writing, in which you formulate a thesis and attempt to prove it, is an opportunity to practice rigorous, focused thinking habits that can result not only in better papers, but in sharper analytical skills across the board.

Support thesis statement
A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.
Additionally, your thesis statement shouldn’t be too big or too grand. It’ll be hard to cover everything in a thesis statement like, “The federal government should act now on climate change.” The topic is just too large to actually say something new and meaningful. Instead, a more effective thesis statement might be, “Local governments can combat climate change by providing citizens with larger recycling bins and offering local classes about composting and conservation.” This is easier to work with because it’s a smaller idea, but you can also discuss the overall topic that you might be interested in, which is climate change.

First, analyze your primary sources. Look for tension, interest, ambiguity, controversy, and/or complication. Does the author contradict himself or herself? Is a point made and later reversed? What are the deeper implications of the author’s argument? Figuring out the why to one or more of these questions, or to related questions, will put you on the path to developing a working thesis. (Without the why, you probably have only come up with an observation—that there are, for instance, many different metaphors in such-and-such a poem—which is not a thesis.)
Anticipate the counterarguments. Once you have a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This will help you to refine your thesis, and it will also make you think of the arguments that you’ll need to refute later on in your essay. (Every argument has a counterargument. If yours doesn’t, then it’s not an argument—it may be a fact, or an opinion, but it is not an argument.)

References:

http://saylordotorg.github.io/text_handbook-for-writers/s10-03-supporting-a-thesis.html
http://www.butte.edu/departments/cas/tipsheets/style_purpose_strategy/thesis.html
http://www.servicescape.com/blog/25-thesis-statement-examples-that-will-make-writing-a-breeze
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://saylordotorg.github.io/text_handbook-for-writers/s10-03-supporting-a-thesis.html

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