how to make an argumentative thesis

how to make an argumentative thesis

An argumentative thesis must make a claim about which reasonable people can disagree. Statements of fact or areas of general agreement cannot be argumentative theses because few people disagree about them.
An argumentative thesis takes a position, asserting the writer’s stance. Questions, vague statements, or quotations from others are not argumentative theses because they do not assert the writer’s viewpoint.

  • This is an argument: “This paper argues that the movie JFK is inaccurate in its portrayal of President Kennedy.”
  • This is not an argument: “In this paper, I will describe the portrayal of President Kennedy that is shown in the movie JFK.”
  • Helps you determine your focus and clarify your ideas.
  • Provides a “hook” on which you can “hang” your topic sentences.
  • Can (and should) be revised as you further refine your evidence and arguments. New evidence often requires you to change your thesis.
  • Gives your paper a unified structure and point.

How to make an argumentative thesis
Cell phones should be allowed in school because they can save lives, serve as learning tools and teach teenagers responsible use of technology.
The single most important line in an essay is the thesis statement. It’s a line found in an introduction, usually the last line thereof, which sets up the rest of the paper. When composing a thesis statement for a persuasive or argumentative essay, consider that it needs to do the following things:
Make a declarative statement of your position on the topic the rest of your paper will support.
Give the main idea of the paper and the three main points that you will use to support your claim
Outline the rest of the paper by presenting its three points in the same order they will appear in the body.
Note that your thesis should be written so clearly and independant of anything written before it, that it could be completely seperated from your paper and still make sense. Let’s look at some examples of quality thesis statements.

How to make an argumentative thesis
When you make your assertion in your thesis, it should be clear and direct. You want your audience to have no doubt about your point. Of course, how assertive you are in your thesis and the content you choose to include depends upon the type of argumentative essay you are writing. For example, in a Classical or Aristotelian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis statement should clearly present your side of the issue. In a Rogerian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis should bring both sides of the issue together.
Still, there are some basic guidelines to keep in mind when it comes to an argumentative thesis statement.

A thesis statement is one sentence that expresses the main idea of a research paper or essay, such as an expository essay or argumentative essay. It makes a claim, directly answering a question.
When searching for a new home, realtors will tell you there are three important factors: location, location, and location. When developing your one-sentence thesis statement, it is important for you to be: specific, specific, specific. Write your thesis statement once and then rewrite it again with greater specificity.

References:

http://clas.uiowa.edu/history/teaching-and-writing-center/guides/argumentation
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7spH7plXqNg
http://owl.excelsior.edu/argument-and-critical-thinking/argumentative-thesis/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/thesis-statement-examples.html
http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/crit_think/ctw-m/ident.htm

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