how to make a good thesis sentence

how to make a good thesis sentence

When searching for a new home, realtors will tell you there are three important factors: location, location, and location. When developing your one-sentence thesis statement, it is important for you to be: specific, specific, specific. Write your thesis statement once and then rewrite it again with greater specificity.
It’s worth reiterating that a strong thesis statement is specific. If you find yourself using general words like “good,” then you’re not digging deep enough.

Compare the original thesis (not specific and clear enough) with the revised version (much more specific and clear):

  • Unless you’re writing a technical report, avoid technical language. Always avoid jargon, unless you are confident your audience will be familiar with it.
  • Avoid vague words such as “interesting,” “negative,” “exciting,” “unusual,” and “difficult.”
  • Avoid abstract words such as “society,” “values,” or “culture.”

How to make a good thesis sentence
One thing I find that is helpful for students is having a clear template. While students rarely end up with a thesis that follows this exact wording, the following template creates a good starting point:
A thesis can be found in many places—a debate speech, a lawyer’s closing argument, even an advertisement. But the most common place for a thesis statement (and probably why you’re reading this article) is in an essay.

How to make a good thesis sentence
This is the research process! The answer to your question is likely to change as you discover more evidence and sources. As you write the paper, keep developing and refining your thesis statement.
What were the main factors that led to the result of the 2016 Brexit referendum?

Anticipate the counterarguments. Once you have a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This will help you to refine your thesis, and it will also make you think of the arguments that you’ll need to refute later on in your essay. (Every argument has a counterargument. If yours doesn’t, then it’s not an argument—it may be a fact, or an opinion, but it is not an argument.)
This statement is on its way to being a thesis. However, it is too easy to imagine possible counterarguments. For example, a political observer might believe that Dukakis lost because he suffered from a “soft-on-crime” image. If you complicate your thesis by anticipating the counterargument, you’ll strengthen your argument, as shown in the sentence below.

References:

http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/writers/tips/thesis/
http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-write-a-strong-thesis-statement/
http://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/

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