how to have a good thesis

how to have a good thesis

Think of yourself as a member of a jury, listening to a lawyer who is presenting an opening argument. You’ll want to know very soon whether the lawyer believes the accused to be guilty or not guilty, and how the lawyer plans to convince you. Readers of academic essays are like jury members: before they have read too far, they want to know what the essay argues as well as how the writer plans to make the argument. After reading your thesis statement, the reader should think, “This essay is going to try to convince me of something. I’m not convinced yet, but I’m interested to see how I might be.”
Once you have a working thesis, write it down. There is nothing as frustrating as hitting on a great idea for a thesis, then forgetting it when you lose concentration. And by writing down your thesis you will be forced to think of it clearly, logically, and concisely. You probably will not be able to write out a final-draft version of your thesis the first time you try, but you’ll get yourself on the right track by writing down what you have.

How to have a good thesis
Position: A thesis statement always belongs at the beginning of an essay. This is because it is a sentence that tells the reader what the writer is going to discuss. Teachers will have different preferences for the precise location of the thesis, but a good rule of thumb is in the introduction paragraph, within the last two or three sentences.
Example:

Think of it as a loving mother steering her children away from danger. Essay writers run the risk of getting off track and wandering into thickly wooded forests of needless tangents. (This is also why a well-planned outline is essential.) However, a solid thesis statement will help keep you in check. Refer back to it and ask have you wandered off topic?
Always Be Specific
A good thesis statement is developed from the point of view of the reader. Be very careful you’re not developing a topic that is of interest to you alone. This is a harsh yet necessary question to ask yourself: will my readers have any reason to care about what I’m writing?

  • Unless you’re writing a technical report, avoid technical language. Always avoid jargon, unless you are confident your audience will be familiar with it.
  • Avoid vague words such as “interesting,” “negative,” “exciting,” “unusual,” and “difficult.”
  • Avoid abstract words such as “society,” “values,” or “culture.”

The thesis statement should do more than merely announce the topic; it must reveal what position you will take in relation to that topic, how you plan to analyze/evaluate the subject or the issue. In short, instead of merely stating a general fact or resorting to a simplistic pro/con statement, you must decide what it is you have to say.

A clear thesis statement will take the topic of the paper and boil it down to a persuasive essay with one clear point of view. It is also one sentence long, so it is important that you revise your thesis statement until it clearly sums up the paper.
It will state your intention from the outset, introduce the reader to your point of view, and give you the main statement to support throughout the paper.

References:

http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-write-a-strong-thesis-statement/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/thesis-statement-examples.html
http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/writers/tips/thesis/
http://www.collegechoice.net/thriving-in-college/how-to-make-a-perfect-thesis/
http://interactivemedia.bradley.edu/ell/nmt/your_thesis_n_claims.html

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