how to back up evidence in an essay

how to back up evidence in an essay

How to back up evidence in an essay
If you’re ever in doubt about whether or not a thought needs to be cited, do it anyways. This goes especially for things like direct quotations taken from others, using graphs or diagrams, including other people’s opinions, and stating how certain research was conducted. Unless it’s so blatantly obvious that a statement made is absolutely general knowledge, reference as often as you think you should.
3 – Consider Alternative Points of View

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  • Claim based on a fact or event (weak): Soy milk contains healthy isoflavones and nutrients.
  • Claim based on an active argument (stronger): The isoflavones and nutrients in soy milk help to protect the body from disease and promote good health, so soy is a better choice.
  • The first example is weak because it presents facts that cannot be disputed; the second example is stronger because it uses those facts to make an argument. As you can see, the second example not only tells the reader that soy contains healthy isoflavones and nutrients, but it also argues that these facts make soy milk a better choice.

How to back up evidence in an essay
How do I write an introduction?

  • Because it is the last thing the reader sees, It is often what a reader remembers best. Your conclusion should be the best part of your paper.
  • It gives your reader something to take away that will help them see things differently or appreciate your topic.
  • It allows you to consider broader issues and elaborate on the importance of your findings.

How to back up evidence in an essay
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u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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Almost every essay on any subject – from weekly assignment writing, to writing an undergraduate or masters dissertation, or even a thesis – has one thing in common: it will revolve around an argument. Whether you are driving home a specific theory, considering an issue from all angles or debating a double-sided problem, an argument should emerge to give structure and direction to your essay format.
Developing the ability to carry out critical reading is key to being able to argue effectively in your essay writing. You need to read all material with a critical eye. When an academic has made a claim in a book or paper, always question it. Train your brain to automatically think: “Prove it to me!” every time.

References:

http://www.umgc.edu/current-students/learning-resources/writing-center/writing-resources/parts-of-an-essay/paragraph-structure.cfm
http://micds.libguides.com/c.php?g=292587&p=1948320
http://www.wikihow.com/Introduce-Evidence-in-an-Essay
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips-strong-argument/
http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-write-a-strong-thesis-statement/

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