how can a claim be arguable

how can a claim be arguable

How can a claim be arguable
If you choose to make a claim of fact or definition, be sure that you choose a DEBATABLE fact or definition. For example, if a student claimed that the Brazilian Samba was a slow graceful dance, it would only take a few moments of research for me to find that it is actually a fast-paced, rhythmic, and lively dance. So clearly, this claim would not be debatable; there is no argument. However people disagree about many supposed “facts.” One debatable claim I always encounter in the classroom is whether or not student grades really measure achievement. Another claim is whether or not a lie-detector test is really accurate. Are methods of torture (i.e. water-boarding) necessary measures the government should undergo in order to get a suspect to divulge crucial information? And what constitutes “necessary measures” in the first place ?
Claims about value generally lead to essays that e valu ate. Anytime a writer places value on someone or something as “the best” or “superior”, that writer is making a claim about value. While writers should always anticipate how to respond to the opposing viewpoint, it is particularly crucial to do so when dealing with a claim about value. For example, people who are blind have a unique culture of blindness, and many believe that living a visionless life is better than living a seeing-life. But to properly address this topic and claim, one must anticipate and respond to the opposing viewpoint, that seeing-life has significant benefits. Another example is that of Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC). One could argue that UFC is a dehumanizing sport. The anticipated opposing viewpoint could be that UFC fighters undergo extensive training and skill-based martial arts, thus making it a viable athletic competition.

How can a claim be arguable
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Claims About Cause and Effect: This type of claim argues that given causes lead to specific effects, such as watching too much television when young leads to obesity or poor school performance. To make this claim, you would have to show evidence (scientific studies, for example) that show television leads to these outcomes. Another debatable cause-and-effect claim would be that video games that depict violence lead to real violence.

If reasons do not make sense in the hypothetical challenge or the ‘because’ tests, there is probably something wrong with the logic of the argument. Passing those tests, however, does not insure that arguments are sound and compelling.
Evidence serves as support for the reasons offered and helps compel audiences to accept claims. Evidence comes in different sorts, and it tends to vary from one academic field or subject of argument to another. Scientific arguments about global warming require different kinds of evidence than mealtime arguments about Paul Newman’s movies. Evidence answers challenges to the reasons given, and it comes in four main types:

How can a claim be arguable
Arguing that a particular person or thing caused an issue.
Vague Question: Are cell phones bad?

References:

http://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-claim-argument-1689845
http://www.comm.pitt.edu/argument-claims-reasons-evidence
http://beaconpointservices.org/2018/03/13/how-to-write-effective-claim-statements/
http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/writers/tips/thesis/

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