essay arguments

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essay arguments

Essay arguments
The subject you choose may not necessarily be one that you are in full agreement with, either. You may even be asked to write a paper from the opposing point of view. Researching a different viewpoint helps students broaden their perspectives.
Illustration by Catherine Song. ThoughtCo.

Essay arguments
It is recommended to choose rather contradictive topics when writing a critical paper. The reader should be impressed by the way you defend your ideas. It is recommended to avoid argument essay topics on moral issues because they do not support logical discussion. Recent argumentative essay topics which are relevant to society will do.

  • MLA (Modern Language Association)
  • APA (American Psychologic Association)
  • Harvard
  • Chicago
  • Harvard
  • Oxford
  • Vancouver
  • IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
  • ACS (American Chemical Society)

Essay arguments

  • Textbooks
  • Books
  • Documentaries
  • Academic journals
  • Scientific magazines
  • Newspapers
  • Official reports

It all seems easy: just select, draft, write and revise. You may keep your argumentative essays for your future job portfolio in case they are highly graded. We recommend fixing them a bit once your teacher returns the checked version to you. The next time, the process would seem much easier to you.

Almost every essay on any subject – from weekly assignment writing, to writing an undergraduate or masters dissertation, or even a thesis – has one thing in common: it will revolve around an argument. Whether you are driving home a specific theory, considering an issue from all angles or debating a double-sided problem, an argument should emerge to give structure and direction to your essay format.
Whilst you may feel that acknowledging views opposing yours will weaken your argument, the opposite is in fact true. Your essay will look stronger if you can show you have come to the conclusions you have chosen despite considering objections to your opinion. If you can write about objections and explain why these are wrong – again, giving evidence – then it shows that your argument is robust, and will also give the reader greater faith in your essay writing, as they will feel your essay or dissertation is giving them an unbiased, rounded view.

Essay arguments
These lists provide amazing ideas that you can use in your upcoming assignment. Browse them and make sure that you choose a relevant one to discuss in your writing.

  • Should Federal bureaucracies be allowed to pass regulations that have the same weight as laws passed by legislative bodies?
  • Would Great Britain be better off if the House of Lords had veto power over the House of Commons?
  • Should judges make their rulings based on the wording of the law, or should they make rulings that benefit society?
  • Do you believe that states should be able to nullify Federal law and rulings made by the Supreme Court if they believe such laws and rulings violate their rights as sovereign republics in the Union?
  • Does the Second Amendment allow for ordinary citizens to own firearms, or does it only relegate these rights to militias?
  • Does the Supreme Court of the United States have too much power over the other branches of government?
  • Should birth-right citizenship be abolished by Congress?
  • Is it a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment for states to deny the franchise to criminals?
  • Is it a violation of the Fourth Amendment for the NSA to collect meta data?
  • Should prosecuting a child as an adult be considered by the Supreme Court to be a violation of the Eighth Amendment?

References:

http://writemyessay4me.org/blog/argumentative-essay-topics
http://justbuyessay.com/blog/argumentative-essay-topics
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips-strong-argument/
http://edubirdie.com/blog/argumentative-essay-topics
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/skillshub/?id=357

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