Cloud storage

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OneDrive’s free plan looks a little disappointing, giving you a mere 5GB of storage. But you can upgrade to 100GB for only $19.99 a year (or $1.99 billed monthly.) And if you’ll make use of Microsoft Office, signing up for Microsoft 365 Personal not only gets you Outlook, Word, Excel and PowerPoint, but also boosts your OneDrive storage to a chunky 1TB each for up to 6 users.

Degoo logo

Cloud Storage

Cloud storage allows you to save data and files in an off-site location that you access either through the public internet or a dedicated private network connection. Data that you transfer off-site for storage becomes the responsibility of a third-party cloud provider. The provider hosts, secures, manages, and maintains the servers and associated infrastructure and ensures you have access to the data whenever you need it.

Cloud storage delivers a cost-effective, scalable alternative to storing files on on-premise hard drives or storage networks. Computer hard drives can only store a finite amount of data. When users run out of storage, they need to transfer files to an external storage device. Traditionally, organizations built and maintained storage area networks (SANs) to archive data and files. SANs are expensive to maintain, however, because as stored data grows, companies have to invest in adding servers and infrastructure to accommodate increased demand.

Cloud storage services provide elasticity, which means you can scale capacity as your data volumes increase or dial down capacity if necessary. By storing data in a cloud, your organization save by paying for storage technology and capacity as a service, rather than investing in the capital costs of building and maintaining in-house storage networks. You pay for only exactly the capacity you use. While your costs might increase over time to account for higher data volumes, you don’t have to overprovision storage networks in anticipation of increased data volume.

How does it work?

Like on-premise storage networks, cloud storage uses servers to save data; however, the data is sent to servers at an off-site location. Most of the servers you use are virtual machines hosted on a physical server. As your storage needs increase, the provider creates new virtual servers to meet demand.

Typically, you connect to the storage cloud either through the internet or a dedicated private connection, using a web portal, website, or a mobile app. The server with which you connect forwards your data to a pool of servers located in one or more data centers, depending on the size of the cloud provider’s operation.

As part of the service, providers typically store the same data on multiple machines for redundancy. This way, if a server is taken down for maintenance or suffers an outage, you can still access your data.

  • Public storage clouds: In this model, you connect over the internet to a storage cloud that’s maintained by a cloud provider and used by other companies. Providers typically make services accessible from just about any device, including smartphones and desktops and let you scale up and down as needed.
  • Private cloud storage: Private cloud storage setups typically replicate the cloud model, but they reside within your network, leveraging a physical server to create instances of virtual servers to increase capacity. You can choose to take full control of an on-premise private cloud or engage a cloud storage provider to build a dedicated private cloud that you can access with a private connection. Organizations that might prefer private cloud storage include banks or retail companies due to the private nature of the data they process and store.
  • Hybrid cloud storage: This model combines elements of private and public clouds, giving organizations a choice of which data to store in which cloud. For instance, highly regulated data subject to strict archiving and replication requirements is usually more suited to a private cloud environment, whereas less sensitive data (such as email that doesn’t contain business secrets) can be stored in the public cloud. Some organizations use hybrid clouds to supplement their internal storage networks with public cloud storage.

Dropbox

Dropbox logo

If you have Microsoft Office files stored in your Dropbox account, you can edit them from inside your browser for free using Microsoft Office Online. Another unique feature is conversions—right-click a PowerPoint presentation, for example, and you’re able to save all the slides to separate image files.

Box.com logo

There’s a mobile application for nearly all devices that lets you upload/download/share your content. The desktop sync client also makes it super simple to upload files to Box. Free users have a 250 MB file upload limit.

Google Drive

Google Drive logo

The total storage is actually shared with other Google services, like Gmail and Google Photos. If you don’t use these services, you can utilize almost all the space for Google Drive alone. Keep in mind that your Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Drawings, Forms, Photos, Gmail, and Jamboard files all compete for that 15 GB free allotment.

Google Drive makes it really simple to collaborate with others. You can allow comments on a document or let files be opened and accessed by more than one person at a time. Since Google Workspace is available for everyone, you can also give collaborators admin control over file sharing via trust rules.

How we tested the best cloud storage providers?

When we test a cloud storage provider, we look at the upload and download speeds of file transfers but this is a minor component of the overall rating as there are scores of other factors that affect your download or upload speeds that cannot be easily mitigated (contention rate, time of day, server load etc).

The other thing you’ll probably want to consider is cost. While the capital expenditure for cloud storage is usually very low (or nonexistent), the operational expenditure can add up when you factor in additional storage requirements and premium features. Be sure to check your cloud contract carefully to ensure you don’t receive an unexpectedly large bill.

Credentials around services and security standards are also key. Look for a cloud storage provider that can boast the certifications that promise an SLA you can rely on – and safeguards that protect your data. In addition, make sure your storage provider offers the scalability you need should you grow – and a flexible pricing model to accompany it.

Last but certainly not least is the level of support that a cloud storage service will provide to its customers, whether it’s 24×7 over the phone or web-based only. Our reviews include all this and more details including usability, and platform compatibility, and compare each cloud storage service to similar rivals, across key features and pricing, so you can make an informed decision based on as much data as possible when it comes to the time when you will choose the best cloud storage provider for you.

What is cloud storage and more:

What are the benefits of cloud storage?

Sharing files via the cloud is safer and easier than many alternatives. Send something by email or copy it to a USB key, and your data doesn’t have much protection beyond wishful thinking (‘no-one else has access to that email account, right?’) The best cloud storage encrypts your files from the moment they leave your device, then gives you a range of secure ways to share them with others.

Many providers allow you to access files directly from your storage, without downloading them first. You might be able to stream a huge video from the cloud, for instance. You can often collaborate on files with others, perhaps with two people editing a document at the time.

Storing files in the cloud gives them real protection from damage, too. Accidentally deleted something? You’ll usually find it in the Recycle Bin. Made a big mistake in the last few edits? You can often restore any previous version of the document from the last 30 days, and sometimes more – a real life-saver.

Where is data stored in the cloud?

The actual location of your files is usually in a data center somewhere, in a server, on a hard drive or solid-state drive. But bear in mind that there are providers that allow you to store files on tape drives and even on other people’s computers using a technology similar to bit-torrent.

How does cloud storage work?

Believe it or not, the concept of cloud storage has been around for a long, long time. Amazon popularized the concept with its S3 (Simple Storage Service) launched in 2006 but the ability to upload and save files remotely on a service provider’s disk drive can be traced back to 1983’s Compuserve offer.

That resource is usually located in a server housed in a data center (but not always) alongside potentially hundreds of others. The process is done over the internet over a secure connection via a dedicated app or via a web browser.

Almost everyone who has a smartphone or an email address has a cloud storage account of some sort. One might even consider Facebook to offer a limited version of cloud storage to its members as videos and photos can be uploaded free of charge to its servers.

How to choose the best cloud storage service?

If you’re more interested in sharing individual files or folders with others, look for a platform which supports password-protected or time-limited links, anything that helps you stay more secure. Businesses will benefit from collaboration tools, too, allowing users to work on files together, add comments and more.

Pay attention to the figures. Most cloud storage keeps previous versions of your files for up to 30 days, for instance, but that’s not always the case. If your provider says it supports ‘versioning’, that’s good, but check the details, see how it really compares to the competition.

You’ll want to consider a provider’s cost and capacity, too, but be careful. Don’t simply opt for a high-capacity plan just because it seeks better value: think about whether you really need that much space. And when it comes to price, browse the small print, look out for hidden charges or fees which jump on renewal, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting.

Free vs Paid cloud storage: what you need to know

Capacities are often very low (NordLocker’s free plan has just 3GB), which is likely to rule out free plans for any heavy-duty tasks. Some free options may have other limits, or leave out important features from the paid plans. IceDrive’s 10GB plan looks generous, for instance, but you can only use 3GB bandwidth a day, and there’s no client-side encryption.

These may not be deal-breaking issues, at least if your needs are simple, and you can do better with a little work. Signing up with one provider doesn’t mean you can’t use another, for instance: set up IDrive for one task, Google and OneDrive for a couple of others, and suddenly you’ve 30GB to play with.

How we test for the best cloud storage services

We begin our cloud storage reviews with a close inspection of the service’s key features. How much storage space do you get? How many devices does the plan support? How secure are your data transfers, and exactly how much is all this to cost?

Many providers sell themselves on their own custom features – clever photo and media management tools, smarter and more secure ways to share files – and we drill down into the details of everything a provider offers.

There’s more to a great cloud storage provider than the length of their feature list, though. That’s why we also take the time to try out the service apps and web interface, find out how easy they are to use, and run our own comprehensive speed tests to check performance.

What cloud storage have you reviewed?

Where did cloud storage come from?

Amazon is widely credited with launching the first true cloud storage. Simple Storage Service or S3 was unveiled in March 2006, almost 16 years ago. The actual term Cloud Storage predates it by more than 100 years. The earliest mention of Cloud Storage can be found in an 1896 book with a title that seems to come straight from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, The Mystery of the White Snake: A Legend of Thunder Peak Tower. 1896 was the year the modern Olympic games were revived in Athens; it’s that old.

Resources:

https://www.ibm.com/cloud/learn/cloud-storage
https://www.lifewire.com/free-cloud-storage-1356638
https://www.techradar.com/news/the-best-cloud-storage
Cloud storage

To add to this, Sync.com offers advanced sharing controls, including passwords, download limits and expiry dates for sharing links. Plus, Sync.com allows you to create and edit Microsoft Office documents (including Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents) in a privacy-friendly collaboration environment, without breaking zero-knowledge encryption.

Best Cloud Storage 2022: Who Is the Winner for Price, Security, Collaboration & Performance?

Best Cloud Storage Services: Personal & Business Storage Providers in 2022

Choosing the best cloud storage provider is difficult. This guide shows the 10 top cloud storage services for cost, safety and collaboration features, covering personal cloud storage and business file storage solutions.

Competition between big corporate players like Dropbox, Google Drive and OneDrive, and the emergence of privacy-oriented providers like Sync.com, pCloud and MEGA, has been a boon for consumers. To save you some time we have a list of what we think are the top players for your money.

Key Takeaways:

Our analysis of 12 top cloud services showed that around half of them only take 25 percent longer to upload and 27 percent longer to download than expected. You can also read our cloud storage CPU comparison to see which services use the most computer resources.

For businesses, you can’t go wrong with a Sync.com, pCloud or Tresorit subscription, as our best business cloud storage list shows. If you’re unsure, key features to look out for are zero-knowledge encryption, server locations and document collaboration features.

pCloud is our top choice for free storage, although MEGA and Google Drive both offer a little more space. The beauty of free cloud storage providers is that you can try out a number of providers to find the perfect fit, with a provider like Koofr allowing you to combine multiple free storage providers together.

Our top choice for the best online storage for photos is Amazon Photos. It offers unlimited storage, will automatically upload photos from your phone and computer, and comes included with an Amazon Prime membership.

A number of the best cloud storage providers offer packages with unlimited storage, but the best unlimited cloud storage provider is Sync.com for Teams. Be aware that most providers offering unlimited storage usually have a set limit, and if you go above the cap, you’ll need to request additional storage.

Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3)

Amazon Web Services Simple Storage Service (S3) is the leading cloud vendor’s flagship object storage solution. It boasts scalability, 99.999999999% durability, advanced security, query-in-place functionality and integration with a lot of third-party and AWS services.

AWS storage pricing varies by region. Prices are fairly consistent among the various U.S. regions, but they can be significantly higher or lower in other parts of the world. Amazon explains the price differences by saying, “We charge less where our costs are less.”

After that, Amazon has tiered pricing that provides volume discounts as you store more data. However, the pricing difference is fairly small. In the US East (Ohio) region, the first 50TB are

Microsoft Azure Blob Storage

Microsoft Azure’s Blob Storage promises massive scalability with tiering for hot, cold and archive data. Other key features include strong consistency, object mutability, multiple blob types and easy-to-use geo-redundancy.

Pricing for Blob Storage depends on a number of factors, including the level of redundancy, the data center region and whether you are using the hot, cool, or archive storage tiers. Azure also has three different account types: General Purpose v2 offers the complete set of features, while Blob storage and General Purpose v1 accounts offer more limited feature sets at a lower price. Like AWS, Azure also tiers pricing to provide volume discounts as you store more data.

Cool and archive storage service charge additional fees for early deletion of data. Read and write requests require an additional fee, but DELETE requests are free. Data retrieval, data write and data transfer to other Azure regions may or may not incur extra charges depending on the level of redundancy selected and the storage tier. Enhanced support is also available for a fee.

Microsoft offers a free account for new users that includes $200 of credit that must be spent within 30 days, plus 5 GB of LRS-Hot Blob Storage with 2 million read, 2 million write, and 2 million write/list operations per month for the first 12 months.

.023 per gigabyte, the next 450TB are

Google Cloud Storage

Google Cloud Storage is a unified object storage solution with tiers for high-frequency access (Multi-Regional and Regional), low-frequency access (Nearline) and lowest-frequency access (Coldline). It’s easy to move data across storage classes as your needs change to optimize price for performance. Google boasts that its cloud storage is secure and durable and that it reduces customers’ storage carbon emissions to zero.

Google promises customer-friendly pricing and savings compared to AWS S3. Its pricing is flat, meaning that the cost per gigabyte doesn’t go down as you store more data, but it does offer reduced pricing on Regional, Nearline and Coldline services as compared to Multi-Regional storage.

Customers will encounter network usage fees when they transfer data. Google also charges fees for operations, but it divides up the possible requests a little differently than the other vendors, so some GET requests and PUT requests cost more than others. DELETEs are free. It also charges extra for data retrieval with Nearline and Coldline storage, and those services also have minimum data retention periods.

Its free tier includes $300 of credit for new users, plus 5GB of Regional Storage in US Regions other than North Virginia with 5,000 Class A Operations, 50,000 Class B Operations and 1GB of network egress. You have to use the $300 within the first 12 months, but the free tier storage continues forever.

.022 per gigabyte, and more than 500TB are

IBM Cloud Object Storage

According to the IBM website, its object storage service is highly scalable and “designed for high durability, resiliency and security.” It boasts 99.999999999 percent durability and integrated high-speed data transfer via the company’s Aspera service. It also offers query-in-place capabilities, as well as a REST-based API and SDKs.

Like most of the other major cloud storage vendors, IBM Cloud offers quite a few different options. First are the resiliency choices: Cross Region (data stored in three different regions in the same geography), Regional (data stored in multiple data centers in the same region) and Single Data Center. It also has four different storage classes: Standard (for hot data), Vault (for cool data), Cold Vault (for archive or cold data) and Flex (for mixed hot and cold data).

The website also lists two different pricing plans: Lite and Standard. However, the Lite plan is essentially IBM’s free tier. With 25GB of storage for free, it’s more generous than most of the other free tiers, and it might be a good option for small businesses that aren’t going to need a lot of storage.

Strangely, the IBM Pricing Calculator on the website doesn’t include an option for calculating storage pricing. As a result, Enterprise Storage Forum did our own math using the information available on the website to calculate the totals for the chart below.

.021 per gigabyte. It has bigger price breaks if you use the infrequent access tier or the one-zone infrequent access tier.

AWS tacks on additional charges for data requests (PUT, GET, COPY, SELECT, POST, LIST, etc.), but DELETE requests are free. Data transfer into S3 is free, but transferring more than 1GB of data out of the service per month will incur fees, which vary depending on the amount of data you are transferring and where you are transferring it to. You can also choose to pay extra to accelerate data transfers. Other optional features include storage management, cross-region replication and paid support plans.

What is cloud storage and more:

What are the benefits of cloud storage?

Sharing files via the cloud is safer and easier than many alternatives. Send something by email or copy it to a USB key, and your data doesn’t have much protection beyond wishful thinking (‘no-one else has access to that email account, right?’) The best cloud storage encrypts your files from the moment they leave your device, then gives you a range of secure ways to share them with others.

Many providers allow you to access files directly from your storage, without downloading them first. You might be able to stream a huge video from the cloud, for instance. You can often collaborate on files with others, perhaps with two people editing a document at the time.

Storing files in the cloud gives them real protection from damage, too. Accidentally deleted something? You’ll usually find it in the Recycle Bin. Made a big mistake in the last few edits? You can often restore any previous version of the document from the last 30 days, and sometimes more – a real life-saver.

Where is data stored in the cloud?

The actual location of your files is usually in a data center somewhere, in a server, on a hard drive or solid-state drive. But bear in mind that there are providers that allow you to store files on tape drives and even on other people’s computers using a technology similar to bit-torrent.

How does cloud storage work?

Believe it or not, the concept of cloud storage has been around for a long, long time. Amazon popularized the concept with its S3 (Simple Storage Service) launched in 2006 but the ability to upload and save files remotely on a service provider’s disk drive can be traced back to 1983’s Compuserve offer.

That resource is usually located in a server housed in a data center (but not always) alongside potentially hundreds of others. The process is done over the internet over a secure connection via a dedicated app or via a web browser.

Almost everyone who has a smartphone or an email address has a cloud storage account of some sort. One might even consider Facebook to offer a limited version of cloud storage to its members as videos and photos can be uploaded free of charge to its servers.

How to choose the best cloud storage service?

If you’re more interested in sharing individual files or folders with others, look for a platform which supports password-protected or time-limited links, anything that helps you stay more secure. Businesses will benefit from collaboration tools, too, allowing users to work on files together, add comments and more.

Pay attention to the figures. Most cloud storage keeps previous versions of your files for up to 30 days, for instance, but that’s not always the case. If your provider says it supports ‘versioning’, that’s good, but check the details, see how it really compares to the competition.

You’ll want to consider a provider’s cost and capacity, too, but be careful. Don’t simply opt for a high-capacity plan just because it seeks better value: think about whether you really need that much space. And when it comes to price, browse the small print, look out for hidden charges or fees which jump on renewal, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting.

Free vs Paid cloud storage: what you need to know

Capacities are often very low (NordLocker’s free plan has just 3GB), which is likely to rule out free plans for any heavy-duty tasks. Some free options may have other limits, or leave out important features from the paid plans. IceDrive’s 10GB plan looks generous, for instance, but you can only use 3GB bandwidth a day, and there’s no client-side encryption.

These may not be deal-breaking issues, at least if your needs are simple, and you can do better with a little work. Signing up with one provider doesn’t mean you can’t use another, for instance: set up IDrive for one task, Google and OneDrive for a couple of others, and suddenly you’ve 30GB to play with.

How we test for the best cloud storage services

We begin our cloud storage reviews with a close inspection of the service’s key features. How much storage space do you get? How many devices does the plan support? How secure are your data transfers, and exactly how much is all this to cost?

Many providers sell themselves on their own custom features – clever photo and media management tools, smarter and more secure ways to share files – and we drill down into the details of everything a provider offers.

There’s more to a great cloud storage provider than the length of their feature list, though. That’s why we also take the time to try out the service apps and web interface, find out how easy they are to use, and run our own comprehensive speed tests to check performance.

What cloud storage have you reviewed?

Where did cloud storage come from?

Amazon is widely credited with launching the first true cloud storage. Simple Storage Service or S3 was unveiled in March 2006, almost 16 years ago. The actual term Cloud Storage predates it by more than 100 years. The earliest mention of Cloud Storage can be found in an 1896 book with a title that seems to come straight from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, The Mystery of the White Snake: A Legend of Thunder Peak Tower. 1896 was the year the modern Olympic games were revived in Athens; it’s that old.

Resources:

https://www.cloudwards.net/best-cloud-storage/
https://www.enterprisestorageforum.com/cloud/cloud-storage-pricing/
https://www.techradar.com/news/the-best-cloud-storage
Cloud storage

Overall, while it’s available for individual use, Box has more of an enterprise focus with built-in features that are particularly useful for businesses. In addition to collaboration with Box Notes and storage accessible across different platforms, the service offers Box Relay which helps with workflow efficiency, and Box Sign for easy and secure e-signatures.

Amazon shopping app

Best Cloud Storage for 2022: How to Choose Between Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, Box

004-box-google-drive-onedrive-dropbox-cloud-storage-apps-cnet-2021

Storing files is a tedious task if you have to transfer them to an external device. But storing files in the cloud can make your life way easier. It allows you to view files and photos from any phone , tablet or computer that’s connected to the internet and download them as needed. Even if you lose your phone or the computer crashes, cloud storage gives you an online backup so files will never get lost.

Cloud storage is also important for people working from home who have to share files with colleagues. Many cloud storage services have a free tier and different pricing options, which means you can meet your needs to keep your data stored safely. The best cloud storage options usually feature individual and business plans.

For that reason, we’ve compiled a guide to the most popular cloud storage services: how they work, their strengths and weaknesses and some lesser-known services if you want to get away from the mainstream. (To be clear, we have not tested these — rather, we are just providing an overview of some of the top options in the market.)

Cloud storage comparison

OneDrive Dropbox Google Drive Box Amazon Cloud Drive
Free Storage? 5GB 2GB 15GB 10GB 5GB
Paid Plans 5000/month for 100GB of storage; $70/year ($7/month)for 1TB of storage. Microsoft 365 Family offers a one-month free trial, then it’s $100/year ($10/month). Family package offers 6TB of storage. $20/month for one user with 3TB of storage; $15/month for 5TB of space for Teams. $25/month for customizable team storage. (With a Google One membership) 100GB: 5000/month or $20/year; 200GB: $3/month or $30/year; 2TB: $10/month or $100/year; 10TB: $100/month; 20TB: $200/month; 30TB: $300/month. $10/month for up to 100GB of storage. Several business plans available. Unlimited photo storage with Amazon Prime account; 5000/month for 100 GB; $7/month for 1TB; $12/month for 2TB (with Amazon Prime membership).
Supported OS Android, iOS, Mac, Linux, Windows Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android Android, iOS, Linux, Windows, MacOS Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, Linux Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, Kindle Fire

Why do you need cloud storage?

You don’t have to, but it depends on your needs also. There are a lot of free options available for personal use. You can easily get upto 200 GB of free storage. If you have a bigger storage need you, all cloud providers will have an option to upgrade at a minimal cost.

You have so many free online storage options available these days. These cloud storage are easy to use and you can get a free storage space up to 200 GB. After a thorough research, we have compiled a list of best free cloud storage providers.

1. Blomp

Why do we recommend it?

2. Degoo

Why do we recommend it?

3. Mega

Why do we recommend it?

4. Media Fire

Why do we recommend it?

5. Yandex Disk

Yandex Disk is One of the trustworthy, free cloud storage options. You get 10 GB free cloud storage as soon as you sign up for the Yandex. You can win up to an additional 32GB storage by participating in their promotional activities.

Why do we recommend it?

6. Google Drive

Why do we recommend it?

7. Icedrive

Icedrive is one of the next-generation alternatives among the best free cloud services for effortless access, management, and updating of cloud storage. Users can access a dedicated space for sharing, showcasing, and collaborating with your files. The most prominent highlight of Icedrive as a cloud storage provider is the support for Twofish Encryption.

Just by signing up, you can get 10 GB free cloud storage. It also delivers a cleaner, and easier user interface for file management. You can also gain the benefits of highly responsive synchronisation of your files with a simple click. Most important of all, Icedrive also supports the streaming of media from your cloud storage and sharing with friends.

Whizlabs Free Tests for AWS Cloud Certifications

8. Koofr

Among the many all-round best free cloud storage available presently, Koofr provides credible 10 GB free cloud storage enabling connection of Dropbox, OneDrive, and Amazon and Google Drive accounts. Koofr is unique in utilising the free space available on a hard drive.

It is easily compatible with android, iOS, macOS, and Windows, thereby providing exceptional flexibility. The other notable features of Koofr directly indicate an automatic backup from phones and no restrictions on type or size of the file. Furthermore, users can also avail an automatic backup of photos and videos from their mobile phones with Koofr.

9. Mimedia

Mimedia is one of the promising additions among the best free cloud storage providers in the present market. You get 10 GB free cloud storage when you sign up with the Mimeda. It basically serves as a cloud-based backup service that helps you curate and manage your personalised file collection.

Users can access and organize images, music, videos, and document files on all devices. The striking highlight of Mimedia is the support for importing from Facebook, Google, Dropbox, and Flickr. The desktop app of Mimedia is easily supported with PC and Mac alongside providing support for uploading any type of content to the cloud.

10. Sync.com

This is also one of the other best free cloud storage available. Syn.com provides free storage of about 5GB. It has become quite easy to back up files with Sync.com only when the users have used something better than the sync folder because exploring the sync.com web panel which offers incredible features is productive. The best feature of the Sync.com is the restoring of deleted files and thereby stops users from regretting mysteriously lost important documents.

Get free space feature is the most excellent feature that syn.com offers. If a user wants to get a bit more space for files and photos what is to be done is tell a friend about Sync and the number of friends signs up for sync gets a free gigabyte along with the user who recommends it to others. The Sync Vault is a feature which helps the users to save files and documents in a special storage space known as Vault which is different from the Sync folder and all that is required to be done just select a file and choose the option of Copy to Vault and your important data gets a backup.

11. Dropbox

This is one of the powerful and latest free cloud storage compared to all other cloud storage because of its great back up features. Any type of small and large PowerPoint presentations, photos, videos, or maybe even other large CAD files can be safely kept in the Dropbox. Dropbox provides the users with easy sync features that help to access the files and documents to the Dropbox from any device.

Final Words on Best free cloud storage

Since it is all about getting the best free cloud storage, it is very important to understand the features that make the best cloud storage. There are many cloud storage providers that not only provide you with free online storage but also many other features. Some cloud storage are there in the market that not only provides the best user experience and incredible features but helps users to enjoy the free services after the signup. But the other cloud storage that is mentioned above is also worth signing up as they all come up with unique features and free storage facilities.

The importance of cloud storage is increasing with enhanced cloud growth and the latest cloud computing trends . With the enhanced growth and the adoption of cloud by businesses and enterprises, the demand for cloud professionals is increasing. And there are even more opportunities for those having a cloud certification.

So, if you are planning to build a career in cloud computing or an aspired cloud professional looking for career growth, start preparing for the cloud certification. Whizlabs Cloud Certification Training Courses will help you in your journey of becoming a certified cloud professional. We are the pioneers among online certification training providers and have helped millions of professionals in getting their career one level up.

Quick Summary of Best Cloud Storage Options

Provider and Link
Free Space
Notable Thing

About Girdharee Saran

Girdharee Saran has a glorious 13 years of experience transforming the way e-learning and SaaS start-ups approach digital marketing for their organisations. He has successfully chartered tangible results, which have proven beneficial. Working in the spaces of content marketing and SEO for a considerable amount of time, he is well conversant in his art. Having taken a deep interest in content and growth marketing, his urge to learn more is perpetual. His current role at Whizlabs as VP Marketing is about but not limited to driving SEO, conversion optimisation, marketing automation, link building and strategising result driven content.

How to choose the best personal cloud storage solution

If you just want a powerful cloud-based service for backups and storage, IDrive and pCloud both offer excellent security, powerful features, and long-term affordability for personal users. However, IDrive requires a month-to-month subscription, whereas pCloud charges a one-off fee.

On the other hand, users who want more out of their cloud storage provider, such as a built-in productivity suite, should opt for Google Workspace or Microsoft OneDrive. The latter is preferred by the offline crowd who use Microsoft Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, whereas online-based users tend to prefer Google’s offering.

If you use Apple devices only, however, iCloud should without a doubt be your first preference. The cloud storage service is not only flawlessly integrated with Apple operating systems, but also comes with its own lightweight productivity suite.

Resources:

https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/best-cloud-storage/
https://www.whizlabs.com/blog/best-free-cloud-storage/
https://www.tomsguide.com/buying-guide/best-personal-cloud-storage-solutions

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