choose the strongest working thesis statement for an academic argument:

choose the strongest working thesis statement for an academic argument:

What you plan to argue + How you plan to argue it = Thesis
Specific Topic+ Attitude/Angle/Argument=Thesis
The best thesis statement is a balance of specific details and concise language. Your goal is to articulate an argument in detail without burdening the reader with too much information.

Now that you have read about the contents of a good thesis statement and have seen examples, take a look at the pitfalls to avoid when composing your own thesis:

  • Who is not paying the teachers enough?
  • What is considered “enough”?
  • What is the problem?
  • What are the results
  • Omit any general claims that are hard to support. Working thesis: Today’s teenage girls are too sexualized. Revised thesis: Teenage girls who are captivated by the sexual images on MTV are conditioned to believe that a woman’s worth depends on her sensuality, a feeling that harms their self-esteem and behavior.

    Choose the strongest working thesis statement for an academic argument:
    Most people would agree that PB&J is one of the easiest sandwiches in the American lunch repertoire.
    A thesis can be found in many places—a debate speech, a lawyer’s closing argument, even an advertisement. But the most common place for a thesis statement (and probably why you’re reading this article) is in an essay.

    As you work on your essay, your ideas will change and so will your thesis. Here are examples of weak and strong thesis statements.
    Beginning thesis: Between 1820 and 1860 women’s domestic labor changed as women stopped producing home-made fabric, although they continued to sew their families’ clothes, as well as to produce butter and soap. With the cash women earned from the sale of their butter and soap they purchased ready-made cloth, which in turn, helped increase industrial production in the United States before the Civil War.

    Words like “ineffective” and “argue” show here that the student has clearly thought through the assignment and analyzed the material; he or she is putting forth a specific and debatable position. The concrete information (“student interviews,” “antibullying”) further prepares the reader for the body of the paper and demonstrates how the student has addressed the assignment prompt without just restating that language.
    You can see here that the student has simply stated the paper’s assignment, without articulating specifically how he or she will address it. The student can correct this error simply by phrasing the thesis statement as a specific answer to the assignment prompt.

    References:

    http://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-ccc-engl-1010-1/chapter/developing-a-strong-clear-thesis-statement/
    http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-write-a-strong-thesis-statement/
    http://clas.uiowa.edu/history/teaching-and-writing-center/guides/argumentation
    http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/writingprocess/thesisstatements
    http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit02/Foundations/developing-a-thesis-statement-and-supporting-ideas.html

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *