arumentative sub thesis examples

arumentative sub thesis examples

An argumentative thesis must be able to be supported by evidence. Claims that presuppose value systems, morals, or religious beliefs cannot be supported with evidence and therefore are not argumentative theses.
Federal immigration enforcement law needs to be overhauled because it puts undue constraints on state and local police is an argumentative thesis because it asserts a position that immigration enforcement law needs to be changed.

Arumentative sub thesis examples
This diagram translates into the following organizational plan:
1. The cigarette butts are harming animals on campus.

Arumentative sub thesis examples
Proponents of this idea state that it will save local cities and towns money because libraries are expensive to maintain. They also believe it will encourage more people to read because they won’t have to travel to a library to get a book; they can simply click on what they want to read and read it from wherever they are. They could also access more materials because libraries won’t have to buy physical copies of books; they can simply rent out as many digital copies as they need.

    • Although it’s a bit unusual to have the thesis appear fairly far into the essay, it works because, once the thesis is stated, the rest of the essay focuses on supporting it since the counter-argument has already been discussed earlier in the paper.
    • This essay includes numerous facts and cites studies to support its case. By having specific data to rely on, the author’s argument is stronger and readers will be more inclined to agree with it.
    • For every argument the other side makes, the author makes sure to refute it and follow up with why her opinion is the stronger one. In order to make a strong argument, it’s important to dismantle the other side, which this essay does this by making the author’s view appear stronger.

Arumentative sub thesis examples
When you make your assertion in your thesis, it should be clear and direct. You want your audience to have no doubt about your point. Of course, how assertive you are in your thesis and the content you choose to include depends upon the type of argumentative essay you are writing. For example, in a Classical or Aristotelian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis statement should clearly present your side of the issue. In a Rogerian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis should bring both sides of the issue together.
Instead you might write:

  • This is an argument, but not yet a thesis: “The movie ‘JFK’ inaccurately portrays President Kennedy.”
  • This is a thesis: “The movie ‘JFK’ inaccurately portrays President Kennedy because of the way it ignores Kennedy’s youth, his relationship with his father, and the findings of the Warren Commission.”

As you work on your essay, your ideas will change and so will your thesis. Here are examples of weak and strong thesis statements.

References:

http://writingcommons.org/article/distinguishing-between-main-points-and-sub-claims/
http://blog.prepscholar.com/argumentative-essay-examples
http://owl.excelsior.edu/argument-and-critical-thinking/argumentative-thesis/
http://clas.uiowa.edu/history/teaching-and-writing-center/guides/argumentation
http://literarydevices.net/evidence/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *