argument thesis

argument thesis

These words tell the reader next to nothing if you do not carefully explain what you mean by them. Never assume that the meaning of a sentence is obvious. Check to see if you need to define your terms (”socialism,” “conventional,” “commercialism,” “society”), and then decide on the most appropriate place to do so. Do not assume, for example, that you have the same understanding of what “society” means as your reader. To avoid misunderstandings, be as specific as possible.
Compare the original thesis (not specific and clear enough) with the revised version (much more specific and clear):

Below are some of the key features of an argumentative thesis statement.
An argumentative thesis takes a position, asserting the writer’s stance. Questions, vague statements, or quotations from others are not argumentative theses because they do not assert the writer’s viewpoint.

This statement is on its way to being a thesis. However, it is too easy to imagine possible counterarguments. For example, a political observer might believe that Dukakis lost because he suffered from a “soft-on-crime” image. If you complicate your thesis by anticipating the counterargument, you’ll strengthen your argument, as shown in the sentence below.
An effective thesis cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” A thesis is not a topic; nor is it a fact; nor is it an opinion. “Reasons for the fall of communism” is a topic. “Communism collapsed in Eastern Europe” is a fact known by educated people. “The fall of communism is the best thing that ever happened in Europe” is an opinion. (Superlatives like “the best” almost always lead to trouble. It’s impossible to weigh every “thing” that ever happened in Europe. And what about the fall of Hitler? Couldn’t that be “the best thing”?)

A thesis statement is a sentence in which you state an argument about a topic and then describe, briefly, how you will prove your argument.
You are the best (and only!) advocate for your thesis. Your thesis is defenseless without you to prove that its argument holds up under scrutiny. The jury (i.e., your reader) will expect you, as a good lawyer, to provide evidence to prove your thesis. To prove thesis statements on historical topics, what evidence can an able young lawyer use?

Argument thesis

  • Your thesis statement should be one to two sentences.
  • Your thesis statement should clearly present the main ideaof your essay and make some kind ofassertion (even if that assertion is about bringing two sides together).
  • Your thesis should not make an “announcement” about what your essay will cover. Instead, it should just present your assertion. For example, a thesis like this makes an announcement:

Still, there are some basic guidelines to keep in mind when it comes to an argumentative thesis statement.

References:

http://courses.lumenlearning.com/wm-writingskillslab-2/chapter/argumentative-thesis-statements/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://clas.uiowa.edu/history/teaching-and-writing-center/guides/argumentation
http://owl.excelsior.edu/argument-and-critical-thinking/argumentative-thesis/
http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/writers/tips/thesis/

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