an argument that is supported by research and strong evidence is

an argument that is supported by research and strong evidence is

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An argument that is supported by research and strong evidence is
Many papers that you write in college will require you to make an argument; this means that you must take a position on the subject you are discussing and support that position with evidence. It’s important that you use the right kind of evidence, that you use it effectively, and that you have an appropriate amount of it. If, for example, your philosophy professor didn’t like it that you used a survey of public opinion as your primary evidence in your ethics paper, you need to find out more about what philosophers count as good evidence. If your instructor has told you that you need more analysis, suggested that you’re “just listing” points or giving a “laundry list,” or asked you how certain points are related to your argument, it may mean that you can do more to fully incorporate your evidence into your argument. Comments like “for example?,” “proof?,” “go deeper,” or “expand” in the margins of your graded paper suggest that you may need more evidence. Let’s take a look at each of these issues—understanding what counts as evidence, using evidence in your argument, and deciding whether you need more evidence.
Instructors in different academic fields expect different kinds of arguments and evidence—your chemistry paper might include graphs, charts, statistics, and other quantitative data as evidence, whereas your English paper might include passages from a novel, examples of recurring symbols, or discussions of characterization in the novel. Consider what kinds of sources and evidence you have seen in course readings and lectures. You may wish to see whether the Writing Center has a handout regarding the specific academic field you’re working in—for example, literature, sociology, or history.

An argument that is supported by research and strong evidence is
Evidence and examples create the foundation upon which your claims can stand firm. Without proof, your arguments lack credibility and teeth. However, laundry listing evidence is as bad as failing to provide any materials or information that can substantiate your conclusions. Therefore, when you introduce examples, make sure to judiciously provide evidence when needed and use phrases that will appropriately and clearly explain how the proof supports your argument.

  • state information that is not “common knowledge”;
  • draw conclusions, make inferences, or suggest implications based on specific data;
  • need to clarify a prior statement, and it would be more effectively done with an illustration;
  • need to identify representative examples of a category;
  • desire to distinguish concepts; and
  • emphasize a point by highlighting a specific situation.
    • This is an argument: “This paper argues that the movie JFK is inaccurate in its portrayal of President Kennedy.”
    • This is not an argument: “In this paper, I will describe the portrayal of President Kennedy that is shown in the movie JFK.”
    • This is an argument, but not yet a thesis: “The movie ‘JFK’ inaccurately portrays President Kennedy.”
    • This is a thesis: “The movie ‘JFK’ inaccurately portrays President Kennedy because of the way it ignores Kennedy’s youth, his relationship with his father, and the findings of the Warren Commission.”

    In order to use evidence effectively, you need to integrate it smoothly into your essay by following this pattern:

    Today, Americans are too self-centered. Even our families don’t matter as much any more as they once did. Other people and activities take precedence, as James Gleick says in his book, Faster. “We are consumers-on-the-run . . . the very notion of the family meal as a sit-down occasion is vanishing. Adults and children alike eat . . . on the way to their next activity” (148). Sit-down meals are a time to share and connect with others; however, that connection has become less valued, as families begin to prize individual activities over shared time, promoting self-centeredness over group identity.

    References:

    http://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/evidence/
    http://wordvice.com/introductory-phrases-for-evidence-examples-research-writing/
    http://clas.uiowa.edu/history/teaching-and-writing-center/guides/argumentation
    http://wts.indiana.edu/writing-guides/using-evidence.html
    http://wordvice.com/introductory-phrases-for-evidence-examples-research-writing/

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